13.07.2010

Around 12.000 Roma and mem­bers of other mino­ri­ty groups are threa­tened to be depor­ted to Koso­vo. Around 5.000 of them are child­ren and minors. A majo­ri­ty of them was born and rai­sed in Ger­ma­ny. They face soci­al exclu­si­on and mas­si­ve discri­mi­na­ti­on upon their arri­val in Koso­vo. As shown by a recent­ly published UNICEF REPORT, 75%

Around 12.000 Roma and mem­bers of other mino­ri­ty groups are threa­tened to be depor­ted to Koso­vo. Around 5.000 of them are child­ren and minors. A majo­ri­ty of them was born and rai­sed in Ger­ma­ny. They face soci­al exclu­si­on and mas­si­ve discri­mi­na­ti­on upon their arri­val in Koso­vo.

As shown by a recent­ly published UNICEF REPORT, 75% of the child­ren who were depor­ted drop­ped out of school. Even when they do get the oppor­tu­ni­ty to visit a school, depor­ted child­ren remain iso­la­ted. Sin­ce many of them speak Ger­man as their first lan­guage, com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on is dif­fi­cult for them. The depor­ta­ti­on thus means an abrupt dis­con­ti­nua­ti­on of their schoo­ling care­er as well as soci­al uproo­ting. For child­ren socia­li­zed in Ger­ma­ny, depor­ta­ti­on is a banish­ment from their home. They have no rela­ti­on to their parent’s coun­try of ori­gin. The stu­dy also shows that every third Roma child in Koso­vo lives in extre­me pover­ty. On an average, the inter­view­ed fami­lies had lived in Ger­ma­ny for 14 years. Every second fami­ly ten­ded to a chro­ni­cal­ly sick fami­ly mem­ber.

In April 2010 Ger­ma­ny and Koso­vo signed a read­mis­si­on agree­ment. Up to 2.500 peop­le are to be depor­ted year­ly. In Koso­vo, the per­spec­tive for depor­tees is liter­al­ly a life in the gut­ters. The­re­fo­re, depor­ta­ti­ons of Roma and other mino­ri­ties to Koso­vo have to be stop­ped imme­dia­te­ly and a generous arran­ge­ment allo­ca­ting resi­dence per­mits needs to be imple­men­ted.